INVENTropolis

Cities are growing rapidy, especially in developing markets...

The climate crisis has the potential to cause trillions in damages...

Global competition is growing between cities...

Mobility Wars!

2019 saw many achievements with autonomous driving, connectivity, electrification, and shared mobility. EV sales set another record, more cities have announced and already partially implemented further regulation of private-car-based mobility including congestion pricing. Uber and Lyft—the two big disruptors in the ride-hailing space—went public in spring 2019. However, 2019 was also a year of reality checks, as congestion and public-transportation woes reached new heights for cities around the world, realization timelines for technology like autonomous vehicles (AVs) were postponed, and some new mobility business models failed to win over investors. Economically, global automakers had a tougher time in 2018 and 2019.

 

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The New York metropolitan area is the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass, at 4,585 sq mi (11,880 km2).[16] The metropolitan area includes New York City (the most populous city in the United States), Long Island, and the Mid and Lower Hudson Valley in the state of New York; the five largest cities in New Jersey: Newark, Jersey City, Paterson, Elizabeth, and Edison, and their vicinities; and six of the seven largest cities in Connecticut: Bridgeport, New Haven, Stamford, Waterbury, Norwalk, and Danbury, and their vicinities. Invited:
  • Mayor Thomas Roach, White Plains
  • Mayor Noam Bramson, New Rochelle
  • Mayor David Martin, Stamford
  • Mayor Steven Fulop, Jersey City
  • Mayor Bas Baraka, Newark
  • Mayor Michael Spano, Yonkers
  • Mayor Harry Rilling, Norwalk
  • Mayor Ravi Bhalla, Hoboken
A population approaching 8.5 million makes New York City the most populous and most densely populated US city. With one car for every four people, public transit is a vital aspect of mobility in NYC. According to ‘Trains, Buses, People’ author Christof Spieler, NYC rail transit accounts for two-thirds of all US rail transit ridership, and one-third of all transit ridership. Not everyone uses rail, however. On the streets, ride-hailing and sharing providers fight traditional yellow cabs and drivers for space, slow buses get stuck in traffic, and delivery vans clog up the roads. On issues such as pollution and congestion, NYC trails other major cities; indeed, a congestion charge for Manhattan has only just received approval for implementation in 2021. Change is needed, but in such a dense, fast-moving city, the challenge is deciding where to begin. Invited: Mark Gorton, Fred Wilson
The scale of investment opportunity in the future mobility landscape is significant but where do these opportunities lie? The rise of electric vehicles, autonomous vehicles and Mobility-as-a-Service is transforming the mobility landscape, with far-reaching implications for many sectors. Historically disparate value chains are becoming connected as organisations gather the key ingredients around themselves in order to compete in this future mobility landscape.As a result, the scale of the investment opportunity has increased significantly, with a $9 trillion potential global market for mobility and related services. What are the winning ingredients for an investment strategy in the future of mobility? Why? To be invited:
  • Chris Thomas, former Fontenalis
  • Brendan Wallace, Fifth Wall (Lime)
  • Brad Greiwi, Fifth Wall (Lime)
  • Ulrich Quay, BMW iVentures*
  • Sean Abramson, Urban.us*
  • Toyota AI Ventures
* Inventropolis alumni.
City streets used to be asphalt, concrete sidewalks with a few trees. But they are much more. Not only are they public spaces, they are an exceptional interface with the public. This panel enables sellers to promote technologies that inform the public. One example would be the LinkNYC or IKE kiosks (Intersection, Orange Barrel). Another would be realtime transit data (TransitScreen). A third would be real time transit apps (Transit). Invited:
  • Intersection - Sidewalk Labs: Ari Buchalter, CEO
  • TransitScreet: Ryan Croft
  • Transit: Emily Gates, Partnerships
  • Pam Cruz, Streetlight Data
  • JCDecaux: Gabrielle Brussel, EVP, BD
  • Orange Barrel / IKE: Pete Scantland, CEO
This panel will enable mobility and mobility related infrastructure companies to sell to city officials, developers and other key buyers. Invited:
  • Ford: Joe Hinrichs, expected CEO (HBS)
  • General Motors: Dhivya Suryadevara, CFO, (HBS)
  • Volkswagen: Augustin Friedel, Intermodality Strategy (LI)
  • Bird: Ashwini Chhabra, Head of Policy (Yale)
  • Lime: Brad Bao, CEO
  • Spin: Beaudry Kock or Shannon Dulany (Yale)
  • Swiftmile
  • BikeHub, Gene Oh, Founder
  • Segway/Ninebot: Tony Ho (HBS Alumni)
  • Gotcha, Sean Flood, CEO
This panel will be a sales pitch to government officials, major real estate owners and corporations the advantage of the smart street, which includes IoT, additional sensors, blue tooth as well as various types of AI predictive technologies. Invited:
  • IBM: Lee Race, Watson AI Communications (Yale SOM)
  • Schnieder: ex Mayor Dawn Zimmer??
  • Cisco: Robert Hubbard, Smart Cities
  • Siemens: Kirk Nesbeitt, Head of Fin Services (HBS)
  • ConEd: Col Smart (Smart Cities)
  • Coord: Stephan Smyth, CEO
  • Numina: Tara Pham, CEO
This panel will enable buyers to outline what is needed. It will give sellers the potential to respond the buyers stated and implied needs.Invited:
  • Retail: Peter Michelis, Brookfield, Norwalk (in contact)
  • Mixed Use: Alex Twining, (Yale)
  • Mixed Use: Helena Durst, Durst Organization (Inventropolis)
  • Residential: Jonathan Rose (Yale Alumni)
  • Public Private: Port Authority
  • Public Private: MTA: Patrick Foye, Chairman / CEO
This panel will highlight the advantages these megatechs offer local governments. Invited
  • Nutonomy (MIT): Laura Major, CTO
  • Aeye (Lidor): Blair LaCorte, President
  • Nauto. Karen Francis (HBS classmate, Board Member)
  • Navya. Pierre Eliott PETIT, Head USA

Urban Nervous System

We will start with an exploration of the current state of micromobility. Both bikes and scooters. This includes the different business models from Spin’s relationship with Ford to what has been Gotcha’s quiet but definite growth model...and everything in between. Using Hoboken, Jersey City, Asbury Park (and a little NYC) we will explore how cities should move forward (and will propose a multi-city, multi-modal, multi-vendor RFEI for 2020).

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AI and Big Data is core to autonomous vehicles, optimization of bus rapid transit and even micro-mobility. This panel will focus in on areas of innovation where there is the most investment potential. Invited:
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
This panel enables sellers to promote technologies that inform the public. One example would be the LinkNYC or IKE kiosks (Intersection, Orange Barrel). Another would be realtime transit data (TransitScreen). A third would be real time transit apps (Transit).
  • Intersection
  • Orange Barrel
This panel will enable mobility and mobility related infrastructure companies to sell to city officials, developers and other key buyers.
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
The Investment Potential. Transportation is a $5.4 Trillion industry worldwide. Companies have invested hundreds of millions. Start-ups have billion dollar valuations. Why?
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
This panel enables sellers to promote technologies that inform the public. One example would be the LinkNYC or IKE kiosks (Intersection, Orange Barrel). Another would be realtime transit data (TransitScreen). A third would be real time transit apps (Transit).
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
Technology Shifts: The internet of things will have won the day, and every new device will be connected. Proponents of the “singularity” have long projected that by around 2030, affordable AI will achieve human levels of intelligence. AI and machine learning will plan much of our lives and make us more efficient, well beyond choosing driving routes to optimize traffic. Technology will manipulate us even more than it does today — Russian interference in U.S. elections may look quaint. AI will create some new kinds of jobs but will also nearly eliminate entire segments of work, from truck and taxi drivers to some high-skill jobs such as paralegals and engineers.
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM
  • xxx, IBM

There Is No Planet B

Carbon Dioxide exceeded 415 ppm in 2019. "The last time CO2 levels were this high was during the Pliocene Epoch, 5.3 to 2.6 million years ago, when the Earth was several degrees warmer, sea levels were an estimated 50 feet higher than they are today, and forests grew as far north as the Arctic." Rob Jackson, a professor of earth system science at Stanford University.
 
Cities will be on the frontlines of climate adaptation. Although the need for adaptation is likely to be widespread, we focus here on cities. Because they are home to more than half the world’s population and generate roughly eighty percent of global GDP, cities will find themselves at the epicenter of this challenge. Rapid urbanization in some developing countries will also likely sharpen the focus on cities. Urban adaptation could drive one of the largest infrastructure build-outs in history. Greater resilience will likely require extensive urban planning, with investments in coastal protections, climate-resilient construction, more robust infrastructure, upgraded water and waste-management systems, energy resilience and stronger communications and transportation systems. Despite the uncertainty around the timing and scale of the impact, it may be prudent for some cities to start investing in adaptation now and to do so in ways that allow for maximum flexibility in the future – without committing to any one specific climate projection.
 

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Although there is broad scientific agreement that climate change is likely to persist, its trajectory, timing and extent are still debated. Many uncertainties contribute to these ongoing debates, among them the differing timeframes of many projections, the potential for idiosyncratic events to unfold, the possibility of unpredictable feedback loops and the assumptions around human behavior that are embedded in climate models. Accordingly, there is little consensus as to exactly how much surface and ocean temperatures may increase and over what timeframe, how high sea levels may rise, how quickly glaciers may (or may not) melt, how ecosystems will react and more. Recognizing the inherent complexity and uncertainties in climate projections, we don’t take a stance on the science or even on the most likely outcomes. Instead we rely principally on the IPCC, which has the broadest global remit and is generally seen as the most comprehensive source of research on climate change.
  • More frequent, more intense and longer-lasting heatwaves that harm human health, reduce productivity, disrupt economic activity and hurt agriculture.
  • More frequent and more destructive weather events, including storms, winds, flooding and fires.
  • Changing disease patterns, which could adversely affect human health.
  • Shifting agricultural patterns, affecting the availability of food.
  • And pressure on the availability and quality of water for drinking and agriculture.
Sea levels are rising at an alarming levels. New York talks about ways to keep away the seas. But is this just unrealistic? Is retreat the only realistic choice? If so, where, where do we build new developments? While catostrophic, what would the New New York look like?
  • New York City
  • Miami
  • Lagos
  • London
  • Shanghai
In response to challenge #2, The Great Retreat the topic of this panel is organizing the retreat of a major city. It will include construction to higher ground, modifying the transit system, the deconstruction of disused real estate and other considerations.
  • AECOM
  • Buro Happold
  • Lend Lease
  • HR&A
While one of the challenges is rising seas, another challenge will be potable water for millions. Specific considerations:
  • More people die from heavily polluted water than from natural disasters and violent conflicts. This is especially the case in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.
  • Rapidly growing cities and megacities are especially found in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.
  • Lots of capacity of planned dams primarily designed for hydropower. If ecological requirements would be leading, only 15% of the economic potential could be utilised.
Once seen as spooky sci-fi, geoengineering to halt runaway climate change is now being looked at with growing urgency. A spate of dire scientific warnings that the world community can no longer delay major cuts in carbon emissions, coupled with a recent surge in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, has left a growing number of scientists saying that it’s time to give the controversial technologies a serious look.
The world’s land and water resources are being exploited at “unprecedented rates,” a new United Nations report warns, which combined with climate change is putting dire pressure on the ability of humanity to feed itself.A half-billion people already live in places turning into desert, and soil is being lost between 10 and 100 times faster than it is forming.
  • Darren Thompson
Given the scale of the task, urban adaptation will likely need to draw on innovative sources of financing. Even the most economically prosperous cities will likely need to look beyond tax revenues to other sources of funding, including central-government funds, public-private partnerships, institutional investors, insurance and, in developing economies, international financial institutions. “Soft” infrastructure, such as laws, regulations and markets that support financing, will matter too.
  • Larry Fink, Blackrock
  • David Solomon, Goldman Sachs

Extreme Networking (Alumni)

E3think launched Inventropolis in 2011 @ Tesla Motors as a think/do tank with the mission of developing and deploying investment-grade innovation to address increasingly intractable urban challenges, initially focused on mobility. The series has included leading experts in the mobility space.

PARTICIPANTS: 11th Hour Racing • Action Carting • Alta Bicycle Share (Motivate) • Atlantic Cup • American Council on Renewable Energy • AutoShare • BCycle • Bike and Roll • Blue Phoenix • BMW • BMW I Ventures • Bronx River Alliance • Bronx Transformation Project • Brooklyn Bridge Park • CabCorner • Coda Automotive • Con Edison • Durst Organization • Electric Motor Werks • E3NYC • EnerKnol • Evatran | Plugless Power • Google • Governing Dynamics • GreenOrder • HEVT • IBM • IdleAir • Manhattan Chamber of Commerce • Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance • MTB Ayiti (Haiti) • Nextbike • Ngine Ventures • NYC Chief Fleet Officer • NYC Department of City Planning • NYC Mayor’s Office • NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission • NYCLHV Clean Cities • NYIT School of Management • Olev Technologies • ParkPod • Plasco Energy • Revolution Rickshaws • Roadify • Sailors for the Sea • Schneider Electric • Siemens • Sam Schwartz Engineering • Sobi • Streetline • Terreform One • Tesla Motors • Think Green • Transportation Alternatives • Trek Bicycles • Veolia • Weeels • Worksman Cycles


Launch @ Tesla

Working with the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, and as part of the running-up bid for what is now Citibike, Inventropolis was launched at Tesla's showroom in New York City.

Mike Calise

Mike Calise

Schneider Electric

David Miller

Mayor David Miller

Toronto

David Pospisil

Tesla

Con Edison

WaterWeek + Atlantic Cup

In a post super storm Sandy environment, WaterWeek was established in conjuction with the Atlantic Cup Sailing Race to develop innovation that could be used to reduce risk of infrastructural damage.

Mike Calise

Mike Calise

Schneider Electric

David Miller

Mayor David Miller

Toronto

David Pospisil

Tesla

Con Edison

Inventropolis NYC Transportation Summit

Mike Calise

Mike Calise

EVP

Schneider Electric

David Miller

David Miller

Mayor

Toronto

David Pospisil

David Pospisil

EVP

Con Edison

Ari Khan

Ari Khan

Mayor's Office

NYC

Ethan Garber

Ethan Garber

CEO

IdleAir

Rebecca Hough

Rebecca Hough

CEO

Plugless Power

Kevin McLaughlin

Kevin McLaughlin

CEO

AutoShare

Eric Apse

Eric Apse

EVP

IBM

Helena Durst

Helena Durst

EVP

Durst Organization

Peter Torrellas

Peter Torrellas

EVP

Seimens

Ulrich Quay

Dr Ulrich Quay

Partner

BMW i-Ventures

Valery Miftakhov

Valery Miftakhov

EVP

Google

Ryan Rzepecki

Ryan Rzepecki

CEO

Sobi

Pete Metz

Pete Metz

EVP

ACORE

Charles Komanoff

Charles Komanoff

Economist

Komanoff

Maria Aiolova

Maria Aiolova

Founder

Terreform ONE

Greg Zuman

Greg Zuman

CEO

Revolution Rickshaws

Regina Myer

Regina Myer

President

Brooklyn Bridge

Ismael Betancourt

Ismael Betancourt

CEO

Bronx Transformation

Roland Lewis

Roland Lewis

CEO

MWA

Christina Ficicchia

Christine Ficicchia

NYCLHVCC

Rob Weitzner

Rob Weitzner

Bike Industry Expert

Harvard Team

Wayne Sosin

Wayne Sosin

CEO

Worksman Cycles

Willem Houck

Willem Houck

Investor

Tom Glendening

Tom Glendening

Founder / CEO

E3Think

Caroline Samponaro

Caroline Samponaro

Director

Trans Alt

Hikyu Lee

Dr Hikyu Lee

CEO

Olev Technologies

Rich Steinberg

Rich Steinberg

CEO

BMW / DriveNow

Alexandros Washburn

Alexandros Washburn

Senior Designer

City Planning

Chris Wogas

Chris Wogas

CEO

Bike and Roll

Laura Bucko

Laura Bucko

EVP

MCC

Michael Ellis

Michael Ellis

Partner

Green Order

Philip Kiracofe

Philip Kiracofe

CEO

Ayiti

Keith Kerman

Keith Kerman

Chief Fleet Officer

NYC

Dr Robert Koenig

Dr Robert Koenig

Director

NYIT

Ron Bergamini

Ron Bergamini

CEO

Action Carting

Inventropolis @ Wharton DC

Mike Calise

Sean Abrahamson

Urban.us

Urban.us

David Miller

Javier Aviles-Lopez

Founder/CEO

I4SD

David Pospisil

William Bryan

President

ValueBridge

Ari Khan

Amy Chen

Founder/CEO

Solar

Ethan Garber

Chris Dattaro

Manager

Lyft

Rebecca Hough

Albert Einstein

Genius

Planet Earth

Kevin McLaughlin

Svetoslav Gatchev

Founder

Delphos International

Eric Apse

A. Gazel-Anthoine

Founder

Connecthings

Helena Durst

Ario Keshani

Founder

Split

Peter Torrellas

Scott Kolber

Founder

Roadify

Ulrich Quay

Adam Lobel

Founder

Sizung

Valery Miftakhov

Bryan McClelland

Founder

Bambikes

Ryan Rzepecki

Tim Meyer

Consultant

IBM

Pete Metz

Jason Van Der Schyff

Advisor

Noa Technologies

Rebecca Hough

Star Childs

CEO

Citiesense

Rebecca Hough

David Gilford

EVP

Intersection

Rebecca Hough

Sean Flood

CEO

Gotcha

Rebecca Hough

Maggie Gendron

Manager

Lime

Ryan Rzepecki

Holly Parker

VP

Noa

Pete Metz

Jeff Thomashow

VP

Bird

Rebecca Hough

Ilya Movshovich

GM

BlueGoGo

Rebecca Hough

David Adelman

VP

Via

Rebecca Hough

Patrick Halligan

Operations Lead

Lyft

Rebecca Hough

Rob McPherson

Manager

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